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Halloween Edition: Cars That Were Cursed

Over time, there have been various stories of ghosts haunting buildings or lurking around lonely highways. Well, it turns out that cars have, at one time or the other, also been the object of specific eerie ghost stories or believed to be cursed.

It is hard to separate fact from fiction with some of these events, mainly as some occurred long ago. However, one thing is sure, they all carry an element of mystery that will have you scratching your head. With Halloween just days away, we bring you spooky cars that were claimed to be cursed.

JFK Presidential Limousine

Halloween Edition: Cars That Were Cursed

The limousine in which JFK was slain currently resides at the Henry Ford museum in Michigan. There have been creepy reports of shadowy figures hovering around and just observing people take pictures of the car.

Halloween Edition: Cars That Were Cursed

The presidential limousine had numerous upgrades that included a bulletproof cover. On the day JFK was assassinated, he had ordered the cover to be removed so he could be closer to the people – a decision that ultimately proved fatal. Bad timing? Or bad luck?

CarBuyer covered a car that wouldn’t allow you to take the top down, but it sure looks gorgeous as hell once you’re on the inside. Check it out in the video below.

 

Bonnie & Clyde’s 1934 Ford Deluxe

Halloween Edition: Cars That Were Cursed

They were touted as two of the most infamous villains of the 20th Century. Bonnie & Clyde were famous for a string of robberies, murders and kidnappings in the 1930s. On the night of May 23 1934, police ambushed their 1934 Ford Deluxe in Louisiana. Over 100 shots were fired at the car, killing both criminals instantly.

Halloween Edition: Cars That Were Cursed

That same car now sits in Whiskey Pete’s Casino in Nevada – still in its bullet-ridden state. Many visitors have reported an uneasy sense of not feeling alone near this car, and some photos of the car show inexplicable objects nearby or inside it.

Like Bonnie, if you’re still on the hunt for your ride or die, check out the range of Fords on our Marketplace.

James Dean’s Porsche 550 Spyder

Halloween Edition: Cars That Were Cursed

James Dean’s career as an actor and racing driver was tragically cut short on September 30, 1955, when his “Little Bastard” Porsche 550 Spyder was involved in an accident on the way to a race meeting. The late actor also suffered a broken neck and was pronounced dead upon arrival at the hospital.

Like James, if you’re a rebel without a cause and is curious about electric vehicles. Check out Porsche’s first EV – Porsche Taycan. CarBuyer brings you all the coverage in the video below.

Elvis’ Red Cadillac 

Elvis’s ghost has been spotted in numerous places throughout Graceland and Hollywood alike—but did you know that his car has a ghost, too? It’s true if you believe in those things.

The Cadillac itself hasn’t been seen since the King of Rock and Roll died. However, Graceland attendees have regularly reported seeing Elvis driving the red Cadillac around the compound. Yikes!

If that gave your suspicious minds, perhaps it’s time for you to catch up with the Volkswagen Passat – it looks even better now.

Archduke Franz Ferdinand’s Graf & Stift Double Phaeton

The Archduke and his wife were assassinated in this car for those who didn’t know. What many people may not realize was that the vehicle had a darker history that followed the assassination. After the Archduke’s death, it is reported that fifteen different owners owned the car. In addition, most of whom met with one unfortunate accident or the other. In total, the vehicle was involved in six accidents and 13 deaths – now, that’s creepy.

We hope that didn’t send you running like the team from CarBuyer when they released the facelifted Tiguan back into the wild.

Don’t be a scaredy-cat. Head down to our Marketplace and check out the thousands of great deals available from dealers islandwide. Happy Halloween folks!

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